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Yereth Rosen

A species of bird now flying north to summer breeding grounds in the boreal forests of Alaska and Canada has fallen on hard times, and biologists are asking the public to help figure out why...

Yereth Rosen

Traces of pesticides that were likely never used in Alaska and have -- in some cases -- long been outlawed are showing up in some Alaska fish, new research shows.

A study led by the National Park Service found “historic-use” contaminants in fish at three Alaska parks famous for their wilderness qualities and reputations of being pristine and protected: Lake Clark National Park, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Katmai National Park...

Yereth Rosen

The areas coveted as sea routes for commercial shippers seeking to exploit newly ice-free Arctic waters are the same areas that are vital to millions of seabirds that flock north each summer to feast under the midnight sun, says a newly published study.

The Arctic is not big enough for both birds and shippers, suggests the study , published in the April issue of the journal Diversity and Distributions...

Yereth Rosen

A few miles from the Arctic Circle, on the United States' only Arctic highway, there’s a sloped area notorious for perennial hazards that have caused vehicles to veer off course and sometimes crash.

With each year’s seasonal thaw, meltwater collects below the Dalton Highway ’s surface to create soft spots known by a colorful -- if technically inaccurate -- nickname: "frost boils." The trouble site, about 110 miles south of Prudhoe Bay and called "Beaver Slide," was known for developing dips and buckles that enlarged throughout each summer as trucks drove on them...

Yereth Rosen

Today’s polar, brown and black bears are the descendants of common ancestors that first began to split off into different species in the early Pleistocene Epoch , more than a million years ago, says a new study by scientists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, University of California-Davis and other institutions. Meanwhile, another study suggests one isolated population in Southeast Alaska may have seen polar and brown bears interbreed as recently as the end of the last Ice Age...

Yereth Rosen

Arctic sea ice reached its maximum annual coverage two weeks ago, hitting a peak of 14.8 million square kilometers (5.7 million square miles) on March 21, the spring equinox, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center . The ice cover was the fifth-lowest maximum since satellite records began in 1979 and fits a long-term pattern of decline, the center said.

March conditions send mixed messages about what will happen later this year when sea ice shrinks to its seasonal minimum, the milestone that is much more important to biological and climate trends, said the director of the Boulder, Colo.-based center...

Yereth Rosen

Some of the rules that limit commercial fishing in the western Aleutian Islands are no longer needed to protect endangered Steller sea lions, federal regulators said in a management document issued Wednesday.

In a 281-page biological opinion , the National Marine Fisheries Service said a new arrangement of Aleutian fishing seasons for pollock, Atka mackerel and Pacific cod has resulted in a harvest system that does not pose additional jeopardy to the fish-eating sea lions...

Yereth Rosen

Climate change, already well underway, poses dangers for people around the world and for biological resources on land and in the oceans, said a sweeping report issued Monday by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The report, titled “Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptations, and Vulnerabilities,” was released at a meeting of the IPCC’s Working Group II in Yokohama, Japan...

Yereth Rosen

The world’s northernmost dinosaur discovery is shedding light on prehistoric life in the far north during the Cretaceous period, according to a new study published in the journal Arctic .

A hadrosaurid vertebra found on Axel Heiberg Island in Canada’s Nunavut territory adds to evidence that dinosaurs lived year-round in the far north during the Cretaceous, despite scarcity of daylight and food sources. The Cretaceous, an estimated 145 to 66 million years ago, followed the Jurassic period.

Though the dinosaur's vertebra was discovered decades ago -- in 1992 -- it is a prized find that continues to be analyzed by scientists...

Yereth Rosen

Even as Alaskans mark the 50th anniversary of the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in North America, scientists are uncovering signs that there may have been four much-earlier quakes of similar magnitude in the past millennium in the Kodiak region. The findings are detailed in a study accepted for publication in the journal Geophysical Research Letters and available for online viewing Thursday ...

Yereth Rosen

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