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Kevin Klott
During peak steelhead fishing season in April and May, angling can be so productive that anglers have bragged to Miller that they’ve landed 10 to 20 fish in a day.
Colleen Mondor

Towed Behind an Airplane on Skis

Here's the latest stunt that maybe shouldn't have happened in the first place: a skier being towed behind a plane on a large snowfield. From the description, the skier is Reese Hanneman, the winner of the classic sprint at the 2014 U.S. Cross Country Championships, and the towing took place somewhere on the Alaska Range. Hanneman later tweeted the video to his followers on Twitter.In case you were wondering, the Federal Aviation Regulations do address towing specifically, under Part 91. There is a section (FAR 91.309) regulating the towing of gliders and unpowered ultralight vehicles. And there is a subsequent regulation (FAR 91.311) that states "No pilot or civil aircraft may tow anything with that aircraft (other than under 91.309) except in accordance with terms of a certificate waiver issued by the Administrator." There's also a regulation against "careless and reckless" operation, which would probably apply here as well.So, either the pilot of this Aviat Husky holds special permission to pull Hanneman around the mountains, or he did well to make sure the videographer never captured his tail number in the video.If you think this looks a little too chilly, you can check out the wakeboarding-behind-an-aircraft video that was posted over at Flying Magazine's website last fall. It also included a champion athlete -- wakeboarding world champion Bernhard Hinterberger -- though it was filmed in Italy. In this case, Hinterberger actually became airborne, along with the aircraft. Maybe Hanneman and his pilot friend will take this as a challenge -- unless the FAA catches them first.Contact Colleen Mondor at colleen(at)alaskadispatch.com.
Tara Young

Back in 1968, Eunice Kennedy Shriver founded the organization that became Special Olympics, the world's largest sports organization for people with intellectual disabilities. The first official Special Olympics Winter Games were held in 1977 in Colorado. Since Eunice’s daughter Maria Shriver was married at the time to a former Mr. Universe, Arnold Schwarzenegger, it makes sense that powerlifting was added to the roster of the Special Olympics competitions.Powerlifting consists of three lifts: squat, bench press and deadlift, all with the maximum weight possible. In a typical competition, an athlete has three attempts at each lift. Since Special Olympics athletes have a range of abilities and disabilities, they can choose to attempt all or only one of the lifts during the competition.Southside Strength and Fitness is an Anchorage gym that specializes in strength training. Hal and Marvel Lloyd have volunteered the gym and their time to help train the Special Olympics powerlifting team since becoming owners of Southside in 2010. The gym is its own little community, and the athletes working out there show support for their Special O colleagues. Bobby Hill, who has Down syndrome, has been powerlifting 15 years and is a top competitor in Alaska, with a cumulative lift of about 830 pounds over all three events during last year's state competition. He’s also known and loved in Anchorage as the mascot for the Anchorage Aces hockey team. Richard Renwick, another top Special Olympics athlete, is good pals with Bobby, and it’s not uncommon to hear them trash-talking as they recover from a set of lifts.Renwick has been powerlifting for 16 years, and over all three events in last year's state Special Olympics competition, he cumulatively powerlifted 924 pounds. Renwick began weightlifting in high school and says it helped him “get more stronger, more endurance, and more in shape.” The competition makes him happy. “I hear people cheering me on and stuff, and I feel that,” he said. Southside Strength and Fitness will host the qualifying meet for the 2014 Special Olympics state competition on May 10. The state games will be held at East High School in Anchorage on the first weekend in June. The Special O powerlifting team coaches are all volunteers. You can help by coaching, sponsoring an athlete, or by cheering them on at the competitions, which are open to the public.Watch this video on Vimeo or YouTube, and be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel for more great videos. Contact Tara Young at tara(at)alaskadispatch.com.
Loren Holmes
Much of Alaska got to witness the first full lunar eclipse of 2014 Monday night, and in locations where the skies were clear, a stunning "blood moon" hovered in the heavens.
Shehla Anjum | First Alaskans
Artist Joel Isaak finds inspiration for his fish skin designs in his Alaska Native and European heritage.
Kim Sunée
Chicken soup with matzo balls, lovingly known by my Jewish friends as "Jewish penicillin," is traditionally served as part of the Jewish holiday Passover meal, which falls this year between April 14 and April 22.
Megan Edge
A state economic trends report says that the beer industry is bubbling in Alaska, but brewers say there is a lot for lawmakers to change if they want the momentum to continue.
Shehla Anjum | First Alaskans
Quillwork was a popular style for decorating Athabascan garments until Europeans introduced glass beads in the mid-1800s. Now, two Athabascan artists and an art conservator are recreating the ancient art of quillwork.
Megan Edge
The sound of dental drills filled the air at the Dena'ina Center Friday, the site of a massive free dental clinic sponsored by the nonprofit organization Alaska Mission of Mercy. By 10 a.m. 700 people had walked through the doors hoping to receive no-cost dental care.
Laurel Andrews,Loren Holmes
Emotions were raw at the funeral of Precious Alex, an Anchorage teenager who was shot to death as she slept.
Tara Young

Kayak Surfing Turnagain Arm Bore Tide - April 3, 2014

A bore tide is a phenomenon in which a tide that creates a wave goes against the current of a narrow body of water. Bore tides typically occur after extreme minus low tides created by the full or new moon. There are just a few places in the world where this occurs -- extremely few in North America. One such place is Turnagain Arm in Cook Inlet. Each season, the bore tide brings kayakers, surfers, and paddle boarders to Southcentral Alaska, to ride the waves. In some parts of Asia, bore tides can reach up to 30 feet high. The ones in Alaska are closer to 6 feet, but they are considered some of the largest because of the length of the waves, at times more than 40 miles. The word bore derives through Old English from the Old Norse word bára, meaning "wave" or "swell".Whitewater kayakers Chad Hults and James Russell set out April 4, 2014 take on the bore tide. The result is a wonderful ride using a natural phenomenon in Anchorage’s backyard. Be sure to watch them ripping the second wave farther down Turnagain Arm past Girdwood, action set to the tune of "Riders on the Storm." The official 2014 tide schedule is distributed by Chugach State Park.
Megan Edge
For the past 30 years, Surreal Studios in Anchorage has seen hundreds of Alaskan musical acts pass through its doors, providing musicians with the means to cut high-quality recordings in hopes of hitting the bigtime.

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