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Arts

Quillwork was a popular style for decorating Athabascan garments until Europeans introduced glass beads in the mid-1800s. Now, two Athabascan artists and an art conservator are recreating the ancient art of quillwork.

Shehla Anjum | First Alaskans
Joel Isaak's love for working with live materials comes from a desire to pursue the historical materials and processes used by his Athabascan ancestors. But Isaak credits the European part of his heritage for the realization of art’s power to express emotion and to communicate.Shehla Anjum | First Alaskans

Artist Joel Isaak finds inspiration for his fish skin designs in his Alaska Native and European heritage.

Shehla Anjum | First Alaskans

Quillwork was a popular style for decorating Athabascan garments until Europeans introduced glass beads in the mid-1800s. Now, two Athabascan artists and an art conservator are recreating the ancient art of quillwork.

Shehla Anjum | First Alaskans

Savoonga artist Jason Iya carves "transformation art" inspired by the carvings of his prehistoric ancestors.

Tara Young

Girdwood glass blower Darby Andrews sees clear opportunities with the possibility of a recreational marijuana industry in Alaska and sheds light on the state's "don't ask, don't tell" attitude towards the drug.

Tara Young
Girdwood glass blower Darby Andrews is just starting to imagine what it could mean for his business if marijuana is legalized in Alaska, ending the state's "don't ask, don't tell" attitude towards the drug.Megan Edge

Each year the World Ice Art Championships in Fairbanks, Alaska, uses tons of ice to create breathtaking works of art. A clever Fairbanks filmmaker, Eric Muehling, recorded the process from the point of view of the ice.

Tara Young
Masks represent physical manifestations of the stories that preserve and perpetuate Alaska Native cultures in this month's featured exhibit at Alaska Native Arts Foundation.Trina Landlord
A Fairbanks teen illustrator is receiving a national honor for her drawings next month in Hollywood.Megan Edge

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Voices

Democracy is not dead in Alaska, but HB 77 is -- for now

OPINION: The death of legislation proposing changes to Alaskans' access to water rights proves that loud and sustained public outcry can indeed change the course of government for the greater good. But Alaskans should keep vigilant for the bill's return.Hal Shepherd