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Photos: Alaska Peacemakers Militia

Schaeffer Cox in a Fairbanks courtroom on April 5, 2011
Jill Burke photo
Schaeffer Cox, in an hidden camera photo released by the FBI.
FBI
Grenades confiscated in a raid on the Alaska Peacemakers Militia.
FBI
Weapons and other supplies, on their own not necessarily illegal, confiscated in a raid on the Alaska Peacemakers Militia.
FBI
Rachel Barney, wife of jailed militia member Coleman Barney, has unwaveringly stood by her husband during his 15-months in jail, and is a constant fixture in the courtroom during the trial. June 7, 2012
Loren Holmes photo
Coleman Barney and his family. His fifth child was born since he has been in jail.
Courtesy Rachel Barney
Rachel and Coleman Barney at Chena lake, left, and a sketch Coleman made from jail, re-imagining the their reunion in Hawaii.
Courtesy Rachel Barney
Coleman Barney, accused in an alleged plot to kill a state judge and others, faces conspiracy and weapons charges in state and federal court. Photographed in Fairbanks on April 5, 2011.
Jill Burke photo
Weapons, on their own not necessarily illegal, confiscated in a raid on the Alaska Peacemakers Militia.
FBI
Weapons and other supplies confiscated in a raid on the Alaska Peacemakers Militia.
FBI
William Fulton is an FBI informant for the Schaeffer Cox militia trial. He made headlines in Oct 2010 for handcuffing Alaska Dispatch editor Tony Hopfinger. May 30, 2012
Loren Holmes photo
Lonnie Vernon faces multiple conspiracy and weapons charges in connection with alleged plots to murder state and federal judges and others. Photographed in Fairbanks on April 5, 2011.
Jill Burke photo

After spending about 16 months in jail, only one thing now stands between three militiamen and their freedom: a federal jury. The 12-member jury that will decide the fates of Schaeffer Cox, Coleman Barney and Lonnie Vernon received the weapons and murder conspiracy case early Thursday morning. 

It took five weeks to present the evidence relevant to the 16-count indictment against the men, who are accused of seeking to obtain silencers and grenades as part of their commitment to use deadly force to resist government agents, real and imagined. Cox, the leader of the Alaska Peacemakers Militia, believed federal agents wanted him dead in order to silence his political activism. 

Once jurors had left the courtroom to begin deliberating, the attorneys began wheeling in the exhaustive piles of evidence presented during the case. Two carts were stacked with semiautomatic long guns. More evidence, stuffed into numerous banker boxes, continued to flow into the courtroom. Before long, the attorneys were wading through waist-deep stacks of evidence, cataloguing each item before making it available to the jury. 

Cash and ammunition seized during the case would not be set out in the open, the judge told them. If jurors wanted to see or handle those items, they'd have to ask. And he reminded the jurors, both seriously and lightly, not to point the weapons at each other.

Read more here.