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Photos: Chef Dixon's almond-covered chocolate toffee

Pour the heated toffee into miniature loaf pans lined with foil
Tyrone Potgieter photo
Roll the toffees into chopped nuts.
Tyrone Potgieter photo
Cool the toffees for about 1/2 hour before serving.
Tyrone Potgieter photo
Our almond chocolate toffees ready for gift-giving.
Tyrone Potgieter photo
Kirsten Dixon

My South African son-in-law has been experiencing many new adventures of his own living in Alaska, among them learning to ski, dog mush, and how to drive a snowmachine on the right side of the trail. My daughter brought him to visit for the first time during a blizzard in the middle of the Iditarod. Certainly, trial by fire – or snow – was Ty’s introduction to his new future family. But, on that trip, he discovered the delight of those little gold-foil almond, chocolate and toffee candies. I am glad the affinity for these has made it to a second generation.

We’re now ramping up for the holidays and making gifts from the kitchen to give to friends and family. One of our favorites amongst the jams and chutneys, breads and flavored honey, is our version of almond and chocolate toffee. Although we don’t serve them in gold foil or in that cool pink tin canister, they are easy to make, they taste just like the legendary original, and recipients are always appreciative of the homemade nature of our gifts.

Almond chocolate toffee (that’s what I am calling it but I often resort to the trademarked name in causal conversation) consists of brown sugar, butter and toasted almonds, all rolled in good-quality chocolate. ...

Recommended: Make Chef Dixon's homemade version of a candy classic.