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Photos: A snowy Bike to Work Day in Anchorage

Fire season started late this year thanks to a frigid, record-breaking April -- cold temperature records were broken statewide, and snow blanketed Alaska through April and into May. Anchorage’s cyclists were hammered with snow on Bike to Work Day, May 17. Normally, late May sees warmer air from the Gulf of Alaska pulled north across the state, but this year, much of Alaska remained in a winter weather pattern.
Loren Holmes photo
A biker braves heavy snow in midtown Anchorage for bike to work day, May 17, 2013.
Loren Holmes photo
A biker braves heavy snow in midtown Anchorage for bike to work day, May 17, 2013.
Loren Holmes photo
Loren Holmes

In Alaska's largest city on Friday, cyclists were hammered with snow-showers on Bike to Work Day. Up to 6 inches of snow could accumulate around Anchorage, the National Weather Service predicted, though ground temperatures would melt most of it.

The same amount of snow is expected at higher elevations of Fairbanks, where it was 36 degrees Friday with a mix of rain and snow. Single-digit temperatures were reported in communities north, including Nome, Barrow, Wainwright and Atqasuk, which logged a chilly 1 degree on the thermometer. 

Normally, late May sees warmer air from the Gulf of Alaska pulled north across the state, but for now, at least, much of Alaska remains in its winter-weather pattern, with fronts descending from the Northwest.

“It is a real fluke. We just haven’t gotten into our summer pattern yet,” meteorologist Dan Peterson said. Next week, forecasts called for highs in the 50s and 60s from Anchorage north to Fairbanks.

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