AD Header Dropdowns

AD Main Menu

Iditarod communities

Perhaps the biggest surprise for Galena came from mushers. Generally, Iditarod dog drivers arrive in the community of 400 Friday night or that afternoon at the earliest, but with this year's blistering pace, volunteers running the checkpoint were surprised to see two-time runner-up Aliy Zirkle pull into the checkpoint just after 6 a.m.Suzanna Caldwell
The Kuskokwim River village of Nikolai, a checkpoint along the Iditarod trail, is grappling with a serious decision about its stance on alcohol even as the mushers approach.Alex DeMarban

One-woman dynamo, 74-year-old Zoe Brinker keeps rural Alaska lodge humming

September 28, 2013 - 8:08pm -- mcampbell
Primary Category: 
Iditarod communities

As the owner and operator of a log-cabin Bush lodge since 1978, Zoe Brinker knows there are just enough part-time residents at Shell Lake and visitors that she can survive. "It supports my lifestyle," she confesses.  "I just love the wilderness.'' 

Brinker has hung on as the owner and operator of a log-cabin Bush lodge since 1978 because she likes it -- and there are just enough part-time residents at Shell Lake and visitors that she can survive. "I don't make a lot of money,'' she confesses, "but it supports my lifestyle. I just love the wilderness.''Craig Medred

The 2013 Iditarod officially got under way March 3, racing into the great frozen Alaskan hinterland toward Nome from a frozen lake in tiny Willow, Alaska. Nine days later, 53-year-old Mitch Seavey became the oldest musher to ever win the Last Great Race.

Loren Holmes

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race made its last stop on the Yukon River, at the village of Kaltag, mid-day Saturday with Martin Buser hanging on for dear life to a lead that had shrunk from five hours to maybe half an hour in the last half-day of racing.

Stephen Nowers

Grayling, population 208, is the last village along the Iditarod Trail's Yukon River run before Kaltag. A winter storm moved into the area just as the race arrived.

Loren Holmes

In the Alaska village of Anvik, the church bell signals the arrival of the first musher during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.

Loren Holmes,Jerzy Shedlock

In its heyday, Iditarod lured as many as 10,000 visitors a year. But that was a century ago.

Alaska Dispatch

Pages

Subscribe to Iditarod communities