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Bear Glacier Lake kayaking in Kenai Fjords National Park

The unique colors of Bear Glacier result from "glacial flour," fine particles that are very reflective, according to scientists.
NASA Earth Observatory photo, courtesy GeoEye IKONOS satellite imagery
Down the middle of Bear Glacier and prevalent on some of its icebergs run dark gray "racing stripes," formed as the retreating ice picks up dirt and sediment.
Eric Adams photo
The ever-shifting icebergs lolling in Bear Glacier Lake make for a mysterious landscape.
Eric Adams photo
Spotted sea otters are among the many animals in native habitat one may see at Bear Glacier.
Eric Adams photo
This longshore bar creates a channel separating the rough subarctic seas of Resurrection Bay from the mellow waters of Bear Glacier Lake.
Eric Adams photo
Kayaking through the channel between Resurrection Bay and Bear Glacier Lake offers a leisurely entrance to the epic blue ice.
Eric Adams photo
Icebergs floating in Bear Glacier Lake give off an eery, luminous neon blue. One can easily kayak up to this iceberg, which is massive enough to be considered stable.
Eric Adams photo
The massive terminus of Bear Glacier comes into view after kayaking across the lake. Hiking on the glacier is exciting and offers indescribable views of Alaska's beauty.
Eric Adams photo
Eric Christopher Adams

Bear Glacier is an otherworldly place, a vaguely lunar, primordial landscape. A glacier with "racing stripes" that slide into the lake. The valley created by the massive, retreating Bear Glacier is distinctly U-shaped, a broad, lush green floor with young spruce and some older birch that comes in handy for rain protection and fire building. Icy fresh drinking water cascades down one cliff face. A wild place with wildflowers as tall as 4 feet near the falls. Nestled in the U, the camping is protected from the sometimes-fierce, subarctic winds off Resurrection Bay. You can hear the surf pounding shoals that protrude into the bay, but it's all beyond a longshore bar that separates you from the rough seas. The bar is known to produce some surf-worthy Alaska backwash.