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Photos: Oil history tourism along Alaska's Dalton Highway

A big rig exits the Dalton Highway for a stop at Coldfoot Camp.
Scott McMurren photo
Driver and guide Larry Terch rolls down the Dalton Highway with a picture-window sized windshield framing the pipeline, Haul Road and Alaska's vast wilderness.
Scott McMurren photo
Breakfast of Champions at Coldfoot Camp.
Scott McMurren photo
The trans-Alaska pipeline parallels Alaska's Dalton Highway, also known as the "Haul Road."
Scott McMurren photo
The Yukon River Bridge is the only span across the river in Alaska. It's 2,295 feet long and 30 feet wide on a six percent grade. The bridge features a wooden deck for ease of repairs.
Scott McMurren photo
Photo opportunity as travelers cross the actual Arctic Circle! Northern Alaska Tour Company guide Larry Terch welcomes a visitor to the "True North."
Scott McMurren photo
Scott McMurren

In the summertime, Dalton Highway traffic is brisk with folks visiting Fairbanks who want to cross over the Arctic Circle. Northern Alaska Tour Company has a fleet of vans and coaches for folks who want to make the day-long journey by road. And it's a long day: leaving early in the morning and getting back to Fairbanks between 10 p.m. and midnight, depending on road conditions. 

There are plenty of stops along the way to get an up-close look at the trans-Alaska pipeline, walk on the tundra, share a meal at the company's "Yukon River Camp" just past the Yukon River bridge. The Yukon River crossing was built for the pipeline. It's the only bridge across the river in Alaska -- and it's a doozy: a half-mile long, at a 7 percent grade. Then there is the obligatory photo-op at the Arctic Circle itself.

READ MORE: Winter beckons busy Arctic tourism season